Different types of Breast Cancer ?

Ductal Carcinoma 
in Situ (DCIS)


  • ​​Also known as intraductal carcinoma
  • Non-invasive breast cancer
  • Abnormal cells have not spread through the ducts into surrounding breast tissue
  • Has not yet spread outside of breast
  • May become invasive breast cancer

For more information and resources visit The American Breast Cancer Foundation

Invasive 
Lobular Carcinoma (ILC)


  • ​​Also known as infiltrating lobular carcinoma
  • Starts in the lobules of the breast
  • Can spread to other parts of the body
  • May be harder to detect with a mammogram
  • Approximately 1 in 10 invasive breast cancers are invasive lobular carcinomas

Cancer Awareness

Life-Style 
Related Risk Factors

Lifestyle-related factors are habits or behaviors people participate in.  Most of the time they are factors you can control.


Alcohol Consumption

The risk of developing breast cancer increases with the amount of alcohol you consume.  Excessive alcohol consumption is also linked to the increase of several other cancers.

Obesity

Being overweight after menopause may increase your risk of getting breast cancer.

Motherhood

Never having children, or having children over the age of 35 may increase your risk of developing breast cancer.

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT)

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can cause dense breasts, which make it more difficult for cancers to be detected in breast tissue.  Some types of HRT can also increase your risk for developing breast cancer.


It is important to speak to your doctor about any concerns you may have in regards to breast cancer.  Your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes and/or other approaches in order to help lower your risk of developing breast cancer.

 

What is a Risk Factor?

A risk factor is anything that impacts an individual’s chance of getting a disease, in this case of getting breast cancer.  There are things that put you at risk which are in your control and you can change, and there are things which put you at risk which are not in your control and you cannot change.

Unchangeable 
Risk Factors

Gender

Women are at greater risk of developing breast cancer. The risk of a man developing breast cancer is significantly lower.

Age                                                                          

Your risk of developing breast cancer increases as you get older.  About 2 out of 3 invasive breast cancers occur in women 55 years of age or older.

Genetics

About 5% to 10% of breast cancers are hereditary.  This means the cancer is caused by a gene mutation, which was passed down from a parent.

The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common causes of hereditary breast cancer.  Breast cancers caused by these genes are more often found in younger women, and can affect both breasts.  In the United States, BRCA mutations are common in Jewish women of Ashkenazi (Eastern European) origin; however, they can occur in anyone.  Genetic testing can be done to find such mutations.  If you are considering genetic testing, it is important to speak with a healthcare professional first to better understand the procedures and if it is the right option for you.

To learn more about genetic mutations which may cause breast cancer, visit: American Cancer Society.

Family history

The risk of breast cancer increases in women who have a relative on either their mother’s or father’s side of the family.  However, less than 15% of women who have breast cancer have a family history of the disease.  Therefore, the majority of women who get breast cancer have no family history at all.

Personal history

A women with breast cancer in one breast has an increased risk of getting a new cancer in another part of the same breast, or the other breast.  This is not the same as the return of the first breast cancer.

Race and ethnicity

Caucasian women are more likely to develop breast cancer but African American women are more likely to die from it.  The risk of developing breast cancer in younger women is higher for African American women as well.  The risk of developing and dying from breast cancer is lower in Asian, Hispanic, and Native American women.

Breast Density

Women with dense breast tissue have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.  Age, menopause, pregnancy, genetics, and some drugs may affect the density of breast tissue. 

Benign Breast Conditions

Some women with benign breast conditions have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

To learn more on benign breast conditions which may cause cancer, visit: American Cancer Society.

Exposure to Diethylstilbestrol (DES)

Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is an estrogen-like drug which was given to some women in the 1940s through the 1970s.  If you or your mother (while she was pregnant with you) took DES, it may have increased your chance of developing breast cancer.

Menstruation

If you had your menstrual cycle start before the age of 12, you may have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

Menopause

If you started menopause after 55 years of age, you may have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. 

Previous chest radiation

If you were treated with radiation therapy to the chest area as a child, you may have an increased chance of developing breast cancer.

God is BIGGER than Cancer Foundation, inc.

​​What is Breast Cancer ?

When a malignant tumor has started from the cells and tissues of the breast, it is called breast cancer.  In order to understand breast cancer, we must first learn the basics of breast anatomy. 

Breast cancers which start in the cells that line the ducts are called ductal cancers.  The majority of breast cancers are ductal cancers.  Those breast cancers which start in the lobules are called lobular cancers, and other breast cancers start in the stroma.

Once cancer cells have reached the lymph nodes, there is an increased risk that the cancer cells could enter thebloodstream.  Cancer cells in the bloodstream can cause cancer to spread or metastasize.  However, it should be noted that not all cancers which are found in lymph nodes metastasize and individuals who have no cancer cells in their lymph nodes can still have cancer metastasize later on.

Invasive 
Ductal Carcinoma (IDC)


  • ​​Also known as infiltrating ductal carcinoma
  • Most common type of breast cancer
  • Starts in the ducts of the breast, then grows into fatty breast tissue
  • May also spread to other parts of the body through the lymph system and bloodstream
  • Approximately 8 out of 10 invasive breast cancers are invasive ductals carcinomas

​​Paget Disease         

  • Rare type of breast cancer

  • Approximately accounts for 1% of all breast cancers

  • Cancer starts in the breast ducts, then spreads to the skin of the nipple, and areola

  • Usually associated with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC)​

Inflammatory 
Breast Cancer

  • Uncommon type of invasive breast cancer

  • Approximately accounts for 1% to 3% of all breast cancers

  • A lump or tumor is not always detected

  • Cancer cells block lymph vessels in the skin and cause skin irritation

  • Symptoms of Inflammatory breast cancer may consist of:
    • Inflammation

    • Redness 

    • Pitted appearance

    • Itchiness

    • Tenderness

Lobular Carcinoma 
in Situ (LCIS)


  • ​Also called lobular neoplasia
  • Abnormal cell growth starts in the lobules of the breast
  • Not considered a true cancer because it is not likely to spread to surrounding tissues
  • LCIS is an indicator that a woman may be more likely to develop invasive cancer in either breast

Can I Stop it from Happening?
There is no definite way to prevent breast cancer; however there are steps you can take to help lower your chances of developing it.  In this section we will discuss breast cancer prevention and protective factors you can take part in to keep your body as healthy as possible.


What is a Protective Factor?​

Protective factors are habits or behaviors that can reduce your risk of developing a disease, and improve your overall health.

Avoiding breast cancer risk factors, especially those that are in your control, and increasing protective factors such as eating healthy and exercising may help prevent breast cancer.

Exercise

Although it is unclear how much exercise is needed, studies have shown that physical activity may reduce your risk of developing breast cancer.

Diet and Nutrition

No specific food or diet has been proven to prevent breast cancer; however, diet and nutrition are very important factors which can help maintain your overall health.

Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding your child may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer.  The risk lowers even more, the longer you continue to breastfeed.


 

 

SYMPTOMS  of Paget Disease MAY CONSIST OF THE NIPPLE AND AREOLA BEING:
  • Crusted

  • Scaly

  • Red

  • Bleeding or oozing

  • Burning​

  • Itching

Stages of breast cancer ?

Stage 0  

             

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)- abnormal cells found in the lining of the breast duct.

Non-invasive.

It is unknown which areas, if any, will become invasive.

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS)- abnormal cells are found in the lobules of the breast.

Non-invasive

Seldom becomes invasive.

Paget disease- abnormal cells found only in the nipple.


Stage 1

IA

Cancer has formed.

Tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller.

Has not spread outside of breast.

IB

Small clusters of cancer cells are found in lymph nodes or

No tumor or tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller.​​


Stage 2               

IIA​

No tumor, or tumor is smaller than 2 centimeters, cancer is also found in the lymph nodes, or

Tumor is larger than 2-5 centimeters, cancer has not spread to lymph nodes.

IIB

Tumor is 2-5 centimeters, small clusters of cancer cells have reached lymph nodes, or

Tumor is 2-5 centimeters, cancer has spread to lymph nodes, or

Tumor is larger than 5 centimeters, cancer has not spread to lymph nodes.


Stage 3                

IIIA

No tumor, or tumor can be any size, cancer has spread to lymph nodes, or

Tumor is larger than 5 centimeters, small clusters of cancer cells are found in lymph nodes, or Tumor is larger than 5 centimeters, cancer has spread to lymph nodes.​

IIB

Tumor can be any size.

Cancer has spread to the chest wall and/ or skin of the breast.

There may be swelling or an ulcer present.

Cancer may have spread to lymph nodes.​

IIIC

No tumor, or tumor can be any size.

Cancer has spread to the chest wall and/ or skin of the breast.

There may be swelling or an ulcer present.

Cancer may have spread to lymph nodes.

Cancer is either inoperable or operable breast cancer.​​​


Stage 4               

Cancer has spread to other parts of the body including organs, and bones.

Most often spread to bones, lungs, brain, or liver.